*NEW Home Energy Leader Program: Help Your Neighbors Save Energy

 

Are you interested in learning more about ways to reduce energy use and HELP your neighbors?  Do you want to earn money on your own schedule? 

The new Home Energy Leader Program (HELP) provides training and resources to residents in Southeast Alaska to lower their energy bills through efficiency and conservation measures.  The program includes a free one-day training on January 23, 2018 in Juneau for one to two residents of each community to become “Home Energy Leaders.”  Home Energy Leaders will use the information and resources they gain in Juneau to engage their fellow community members to reduce energy use. This includes changing out up to five bulbs to LEDs.

CALL TODAY! Community members interested in participating in the program as an Energy Leader or a resident participant should contact SSP Energy Catalyst Shaina Kilcoyne, S.kilcoyne@realaska.org or (907) 331 – 7409. 

This program is unique because it provides the Home Energy Leaders with the knowledge and hardware to enable them to immediately implement efficiency improvements in their community when they return from the training.

Training: The one-day training in Juneau will be presented by a team that includes Certified Energy Manager Jim Fowler of Energy Audits of Alaska, a representative from the Alaska Housing Finance Corporation and local utility experts. There are limited travel scholarships available for Yakutat, Hoonah, Kake, Angoon and Metlakatla. Contact Shaina Kilcoyne at s.kilcoyne@realaska.org for more information.  The January 23rd training will include the following content:

  • Analysis of utility bills and consumption
  • Light bulb savings comparison
  • Use of kilowatt meters to assess appliance draw
  • Eliminating phantom power consumption & using power strips
  • Installation of weather stripping and reduction of air infiltration
  • Programming and using programmable thermostats
  • Testing water temperature
  • Checking air filters and refrigeration coils
  • Installing faucet aerators and low flow showerheads
  • A hands-on site visit to a home

In addition to the training content, Home Energy Leaders will also receive an ipad to work on and materials necessary to engage residents in their communities including: Home Energy Savings guides; energy cost charts with community-specific rates; kilowatt meters; LED bulbs; thermometers; faucet aerators; power strips; and weather stripping.

Resident Participation: After qualifying the resident, the Home Energy Leader will schedule and perform a “site assessment”, which includes analysis of heat and electric consumption, light bulb inventory and LED swap out, plug load assessment, installation of weather stripping, refrigeration coil and air filter check, installation of aerators and low flow shower heads.  Site assessment features will be completed as needed.

Each participating resident must pay $25 for the site assessment, which will go back into the Program to allow more homes to be assessed. Limited funds are available for supplies and to compensate Energy Leaders for their time, contact s.kilcoyne@realaska.org for more information. 

Thank you for your interest in this program.  Please direct any inquiries to:  Shaina Kilcoyne | Renewable Energy Alaska Project | Sustainable Southeast Partnership | s.kilcoyne@realaska.org | 907-331-7409

Robert Venables |Southeast Conference |energy@seconference.org | 907-723-0177

This program is funded by the Alaska Conservation Foundation and the Sustainable Southeast Partnership

 

Exploring Air Source Heat Pumps

Prince of Wales residents were invited to attend an Air Source Heat Pump Expo on this spring at the Craig High School. The Expo featured guest speaker Dana Fischer from Efficiency Maine, and included mechanical contractors, financial institutions, and experts statewide through a webinar.

The event was organized because the micro-grid that supplies POW residents with electricity will soon have more hydro power electricity on-line, than the island currently demands. Today most of POW residents use diesel oil to heat buildings; the new hydro plant may provide a unique opportunity for residents to convert to a more efficient and sustainable heating option.

What are Air Source Heat Pumps? Air source heat pumps (ASHP) use electricity to circulate air through a heat pump, this is the same technology used in your refrigerator, but in reverse. The heat pump extracts heat from the air outside and transfers it into the building. Even in cold climates, outdoor air contains heat. The efficiency of a heat pump will change with the temperature outside. High performance ASHP models have been shown to perform at, and below, 00F.

In southeast Alaska’s mild climate, heat pumps can have a coefficient of efficiency (COE) that surpasses other heating technologies. For example, a COE of 2 means that for every one unit of energy which goes into the heat pump system, two units of energy are produced. It is typical for a heat pump unit to deliver four units of heat for every unit of electricity at 50°F, but only deliver two units of heat for every unit of electricity at a temperature of zero.  However, a COE of two is still much better than the COE for heating fuel (COE of 0.85), or electric space heaters (COE of 1), neither of which change depending on temperature.

Electric Rates and Conversion to an ASHP: Hiilangaay Hydropower is expected to come online in 2018. The 5-megawatt hydropower project near Hydaburg will eliminate the need for diesel powered electric generation (except during times of maintenance), and result in a surplus of clean energy available for future growth on the island. Growth in electric demand will actually result in utility fixed costs being spread over a larger sales base, resulting in downward pressure on rates.

Prince of Wales residential customers currently pay $0.25 per kWh, $0.23 per kWh with Power Cost Equalization (PCE). Heat pump use and the related cost will vary by household circumstances. AP&T strongly encourages customers to do their own research and analysis based on the cost of heating fuel, electricity, heating habits, and the age/ efficiency of the old heating system.  

It can be challenging for consumers to predict the cost comparison over time, because today’s fuel and electric prices are unlikely to be the same as tomorrows. One advantage offered by ASHPs on Prince of Wales Island is that they provide more stable, predictable pricing due to the fact that they use locally available hydropower. The price of hydropower is relatively flat, and is not susceptible to global events which impact the supply and price of oil.

Homeowners are encouraged to maintain a back up heat system for very cold temperatures. This allows consumers to use fuel if diesel prices temporarily fall, allowing residents to take advantage of temporary price swings. Some consumers also choose to keep wood stoves or propane heaters as supplemental heat sources.

The Cold Climate Housing Research Center has done a lot of research on the effectiveness of ASHP’s in Alaska, and specifically in SE Alaska. For more information, including contact information for mechanical installers and financial institutions, visit AP&T.  To request an Air Source Heat Pump financial calculator, email s.kilcoyne@realaska.org

 

 

 

Exciting Announcement for SE Businesses!

 

Southeast Conference, Renewable Energy Alaska Project (REAP) and the Sustainable Southeast Partnership (SSP) are excited to announce a second round of funding for commercial building audits through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Development program.

SE Energy Audit Application Audit Flyer2 copy

 

If you are a commercial building owner, manager or tenant in Southeast Alaska, now is your chance to get an energy assessment of your building. Thanks to the U.S.D.A. grant, businesses pay just 25% of the cost of the audit!Cost_Audits

Last year, businesses and public facilities in Hoonah, Haines and Prince of Wales Island participated, receiving 29 Level I energy audits and 5 Level II audits. The 34 audited buildings totaled over 230,000 ft2. In all, the recommended energy efficiency measures total $382,701. These lighting, HVAC and other recommendations will yield an estimated annual savings of $173,782, a 2.2-year payback if implemented.

Interested Southeast businesses should contact Robert Venables (energy@seconference.org) or Shaina Kilcoyne (s.kilcoyne@realaska.org). Communities will need at least three businesses to get them on the Auditor’s schedule, so talk to your neighbors!

With an audit, businesses will be eligible for USDA’s Rural Energy for America grant and loan Program for renewable energy and energy efficiency measures. Loan Guarantees are competed continuously throughout the year.

Strategic Energy Planning in Hoonah

Community members clustered around tables at the Hoonah Indian Association (HIA) community building in Hoonah on Sunday afternoon. Some had already celebrated Mother’s Day in the morning and now were here to discuss energy solutions in their small islanded-grid town of 800. Hoonah became one of five high priority areas for the Department of Energy’s Office of Indian Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory when HIA was accepted into the Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (START) program in 2015.

Participants categorize energy projects and goals for discussion

Participants categorize energy projects and goals for discussion

The first step of the program is to complete a three-day community meeting in order to develop a Strategic Energy Plan for Hoonah.  Many efficiency and renewable energy priorities were discussed throughout the three day meeting.

You can find energy data on Hoonah and all Alaskan communities through the Alaska Energy Data Gateway.

Community members discuss an energy vision with the help of moderator Paul Kabotie, Kabotie Consulting

Community members discuss an energy vision with the help of moderator Paul Kabotie, Kabotie Consulting

 

Wrapping up Energy Audits – Thank You!

This summer, SSP’s Regional Energy Catalyst brought together energy experts to the communities of Haines, Hoonah, and Prince of Wales Island to help commercial building owners identify energy savings through a Level I Walk Through Energy Audit. With the help  of on-the-ground Community Catalysts, the team was able to identify plenty of interested commercial building owners, managers and tenants.  Jim Fowler of Energy Audits of Alaska audited 35 buildings totaling nearly 230,000ft2! These Level I Audits were paid for by the Sustainable Southeast Partnership, Alaska Housing Finance Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, with support from Southeast Conference, Renewable Energy Alaska Project, and Alaska Energy Authority. By coordinating the audits all together, the cost of these audits was cut by an estimated 2/3. The effort also included free energy workshops and outreach to numerous other building owners, managers and tenants through a ‘walking workshop.”

Direct follow up is being provided for all building owners that received an audit report.  The real results will hopefully be realized in the coming weeks and months.  We are optimistic that businesses can save money on their bottom line with energy efficiency measures, and hopefully re-invest in their businesses and community.  Thank you to all participants and partners!

EE Workshop Partners

 

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