TRAYLS report by bob – Hamilton River

Today we (Terri, Skylar, Yajaira, Chris, Ryan and Bob) went to the estuary meadows of the Hamilton River to look for a place to install a trail camera. We are hoping to capture photos of Moose, Bears, Wolves, Mink, Marten and other wildlife that may be using the area. We took the Hamilton River Trail down to the meadows but we did not want to install the camera on the people trail, even though it is likely a popular trail for wildlife too, because we did not want to be taking pictures of people without them knowing about it.

Testing the trail camera on the bear trail near Hamilton River.

We talked about how vegetation provides food and cover for wildlife and how if we understand how to identify food and cover values in wildlife habitat we can use that information to choose a good location for setting up the trail camera. We also talked about animal sign and how there are two important categories for it: ephemeral sign only lasts for a little while, like tracks and scat; and perennial sign lasts a long time like well-worn trails and sign trees.

We decided to pick an area that provided food and cover for as many species as possible so we looked for some big trees (cover) that were next to shrub thickets (foods in the form of berries and woody browse), meadows (food in the form of herbaceous leaves, stems and roots), and the river (food in the form of salmon).

After hiking to a spot with good food and cover values, we looked for perennial wildlife sign and found both a well-worn trail as well as a set of sign trees. There was even some ephemeral sign in the form of bear scat and a bear bed along the trail (look close in the photo). We found a good mounting tree that could take in the view of the trail and we set up the camera. Then we tested the camera by taking turns walking the trail like a bear or wolf might do.

That was fun.

Bob

Fostering Youth Opportunities

Photo By: Quinn Aboudara

Students from the Klawock Middle School hike through the Harris River Interpretative Site.

Spring is turning into summer and schools around the nation are releasing their students to a well-deserved vacation. The schools in Klawock, Alaska are no exception. There’s a catch however. Before letting kids head home for summer vacation, the Klawock School District is releasing students into the woods. 

On May 24th, teachers Abe Horpstead and Corby Weyhmiller loaded 18 students from the Klawock Middle School into vans to go on a field trip put together by a diverse group of professionals who make their living working in the woods.

Weyhmiller, of Klawock City School District, stated “This was a great opportunity for students to learn in the greatest classroom we have available.  Our students had a blast learning from nature and seeing local people that have made a living that allows them to explore, protect, and manage our natural world. ”

Bob Girt of Sealaska Timber, along with Gary Lawton, a forestry and silviculture consultant for Sealaska Timber coordinated with Stephen SueWing, a Development Specialist with the State of Alaska Division of Economic Development, Michael Kampnich of The Nature Conservancy, and Quinn Aboudara a community catalyst with the Sustainable Southeast Partnership and Klawock Cooperative Association to engage local youths. Kai Environmental Consulting Services, based in Southeast Alaska generously provided lunch for these students and instructors in the field.

Bob Girt of Sealaska demonstrates some of the equipment used in many forestry careers.

 

Eighteen students from the Klawock Middle School first stopped along the Klawock Lake watershed where introductions were made and the students were able to speak with Aboudara.  Aboudara spoke of the many restoration and research projects throughout the watershed.  The students asked questions in regards to local sockeye salmon populations and possible careers in research fields.

Next, the students met Bob Girt and Gary Lawton at the Harris River Interpretive Site, a United States Forest Service experimental forest site that demonstrates various land management prescriptions such as different forms of tree thinning.  Lawton, who had worked for the United States Forest Service for thirty-six years, discussed some of the benefits of the various forms of tree thinning as well as the numerous career paths associated with the Forest Service.  Girt, demonstrated various types of equipment used by many in forestry careers.

Left to Right: Gary Lawton, Bob Girt, Stephen SueWing, and Michael Kampnich

 

The students then joined Michael Kampnich at the Harris River Campground, where they learned of The Nature Conservancy’s role in a number of projects around Prince of Wales Island, including genetic sampling of wolves, various restoration projects around the island, and supporting the various works engaged in by multiple tribes and other interested organizations. 

This field trip is one of many ways in which the State of Alaska’s Division of Economic Development has been partnering with local tribal organizations such as Klawock Cooperative Association and the Organized Village of Kasaan, regional corporations such as Sealaska, other interests such as The Nature Conservancy, and local schools to engage with youth to foster opportunity and interest in the forest and promote local workforce development. 

 

2017 Mid-year Sustainable Southeast Partnership Summit

Partners and collaborators met in Juneau for a two day bi-annual SSP workshop in March. This workshop coincided with SE Conference’s Mid-Session Summit. The success and utility of the SSP network relies heavily on the commitment of partners to meet in-person twice a year. Spending time together to share information and ideas always leads to improved collaboration across the region. We saw over 50 people participate in the two day event, and many of them noted that it was a priority to attend because they see the value it brings to be tapped into the SSP network.

We used the two days to explore specific ideas including; ideas for improving the network in 2017, reflection on how we as individuals and organizations both provide and receive benefits through the partnership, and building an SSP story bank. Southeast Alaska has a rich history rooted in the use of storytelling for sharing knowledge, skills and inspiration. The SSP prioritizes sharing compelling and progressive stories to strengthening projects and connections between our rural villages across the region. We spent one afternoon brainstorming storytelling ideas based on our projects and work and started to discuss and map out strategies for sharing those stories to inspire positive change.

For the full version of the summary with answers to the workshop questions we worked on collaboratively click here.

Moving Forward in 2017: Communication is Key for a Thriving Partnership

Written by Alana Peterson, Program Director

I can’t believe 2017 is already here! I have a good feeling about this year, especially for the work we are doing together as a network. With limited resources and an unknown political climate, each of our organizations must prioritize our efforts on projects that will move our communities and region forward. No big deal… Right?

Our shared mission of creating resilient Southeast communities is achievable if we each commit to this model of collaboration and partnership. I know that SSP can serve as a successful model for other areas of Alaska. When they ask us how we achieved success, we will say the greatest challenge to making this network a success was through effective and deliberate communication. This means being thoughtful in every interaction. Effective communication can occur at any time, it can be during a meeting with staff, in a presentation to a group of people, through an email, or even through a monthly google hangout meeting. It is in those brief interactions that we make connections, and share ideas that create solutions or spur innovation within our collective efforts.

The point is, if we plan to make 2017 the best year SSP has had, then we need to start the year off right by sharing and communicating as effectively as we can. I hope to provide some opportunities to grow your individual communication skills during our monthly google hangouts as well as during our in-person meeting in Juneau March 16 & 17.

Here are ways you can become more involved and start communicating with the partnership on the work your organization is doing:

  1.       Newsletter Contributions

This is an online platform that works much like a private group on Facebook, where SSP partners can communicate in a public forum on a daily basis. I encourage you all to engage in the dialogue that is happening on the Google+ page daily! The more people contribute, the more useful it becomes.   If  you have an idea please share it with us at info@sustainablesoutheast.net. Also, please subscribe to this seasonal newsletter by clicking here. 

  1.       Google+ Community

This is an online platform that works much like a private group on Facebook, where SSP partners can communicate in a public forum on a daily basis. I encourage you all to engage in the dialogue that is happening on the Google+ page daily! The more people contribute, the more useful it becomes. Partners, please continue to contribute and follow along by clicking here. 

  1.       Midyear Meeting

We have scheduled to hold our next in-person meeting March 16 & 17 to coincide with Southeast Conference’s Midsession Summit in Juneau. I will send along an agenda in the near future. If you have attended our annual retreat in the past, you know how valuable these face-to-face opportunities are. This event is where we connect, improve our ability to work collectively, and get some relevant skills training (communication skills and much more!). If you know of someone or other entities that would like to participate in this event, let me know and I can make sure they get an invitation. I am also welcoming ideas for this meeting; if there is something of particular interest to you or your entity, let me know and we can try to make it happen!

  1.       Deciding the Future of SSP

In 2017 we will develop a plan to make the SSP a self-sustaining network that no-longer relies (solely) on grant funding; we are creating a steering committee called the SSP Sustainability Planning Group. This group will meet in person in Juneau on February 2nd and 3rd. This meeting will determine how to best utilize the remaining years of funding that are available and leverage those funds in the best way possible. This group will not be responsible for making the sustainability plan, but they will help to inform the plan that gets produced.  Please send me an email letting me know you would like to participate in this 2-day working group. We would really like to get as much input at this stage, so all are welcome to join (we can do video conferencing as well). Also look for a draft agenda to come in an email in the near future.

  1.       Inclusivity

This partnership is inclusive, so if you know of someone or an entity that would like to be a part of SSP, send them my way and we can get them connected as well!

Annual Retreat Helps Chart Path Forward for Partnership

By Alana Peterson

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One key element to a successful partnership is communication. In the Sustainable Southeast Partnership, our partner organizations model deliberate communication that results in action. We meet on a monthly basis through Google+ video hangouts where we share ideas and information to strengthen our collaborative efforts. We also participate in daily dialogue on our Google+ community page. Our blog posts, emails, phone calls, and community visits all contribute to a network of individuals and organizations that are highly collaborative, sharing resources, and learning from each other along the way. Finally, we commit to communicating through in-person visits as frequently as possible and commit to two full partnership meetings twice a year (once in fall and once in spring).

This year’s autumn retreat took place in Hoonah, Alaska from October 3-7th. We used this time to develop year-long work plans for our individual and collective projects, learn about projects in Hoonah, and strategize ways to grow and strengthen the partnership in 2017.

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Our retreat included a site visit to the new deep water dock and Icy Strait Point, a cruise ship destination that includes adventure options, a zip line, restaurants, a museum and shops. The group was not only inspired by the expansive project that is unique to see in a small SE village, but was also excited to learn about how cultural values and the community have been a priority through the development and implementation of the tourism site. Our group was led by a local Huna Totem shareholder, Brittany who started working at ISP as a ticket taker, and has moved up in the ranks to now working administrative functions in the office. It was clear she has pride in her work, and impressed our entire group in her knowledge and ability to answer all of our questions. We learned that decisions at ISP are made based on a filter of authenticity. Icy Strait Point was built to be as true to the culture and community it represents as possible.

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We also spent time learning about the Hoonah Native Forest Partnership, a powerful new model for land management in SE Alaska.

The retreat also included a day-long workshop for community engagement. The workshop, led by Element Agency, gave each partner new skills and tools to plan successful community events such as meetings, workshops, etc. We put the new tools to use by planning and facilitating a community meeting in Hoonah. The goal of the community meeting was to introduce our partnership and outline the current projects in Hoonah. We then opened up discussion to the participants to learn about priority projects that the community has identified, and support those efforts through the SSP network. The meeting concluded with a beautiful performance from the Mt. Fairweather dancers who also prepared a tasty dinner for the event.

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Other outcomes of this years retreat included a review of 13 successes from last year’s projects. Between all SSP partners, over 50 projects are taking place in 2017. A full list of those projects can be viewed by clicking here. The partners also dedicated four hours to identifying four priority areas to strengthen the SSP in 2017, they include:

(1) Promote the SSP collective impact model and Triple Bottom Line approach to economic development in each of our communities through direct outreach.

(2) Catalysts & Partners will engage the community, new partners and new demographics to increase community ownership of the Sustainable Southeast Partnership.

(3)  All partners will work towards making SSP self-sustaining by improving and implementing our metrics to communicate success for potential funders and by building capacity to fundraise within partner organizations (this includes capacity building activities).

(4)  All partners will demonstrate success in projects this year through strategizing community outreach through each communications output and achieving one clear project success in each community this year.

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For each of these four initiatives, each participant wrote down one or two actionable steps they will take as individuals this year to move the partnership forward on each initiative. Though tired and drained from a long week of collaborative work, each partner left Hoonah reinvigorated and excited about the year of work ahead.

Community Catalyst Report: Sitka

I am fresh off of our trip to Vancouver for the Community Development coursework and looking forward to our SSP retreat this week. Here is a brief summary of some of the work and progress in Sitka!

• It looks like a tiny house with the UAS course is not in the cards this semester/year. There are several road blocks and issues at this time.However, I am partnering with the class to construct a new Visitors Bureau kiosk. So far we are slated to provide a portion of the materials through our project fundingI am also working with Pat to source as much lumber as possible through local millers. My goal is that we can also have some sort of interpretive signage and brochures at the kiosk highlighting the local materials. The structure will be about the size of a tiny home, so it is a nice compromise for now. I am meeting with instructors at the High School this week to revisit potential project options there. I also attended a meeting yesterday at the city with several community members interested in microhomes and affordable housing projects. I am hoping for two things: first some major policy changes that will facilitate future microhome projects, and second, a potential partnership with some of the attendees, SCS and Sitka High.

• Renovations are on-going at Sitka Kitch and we hope to have them wrapped up in the next two weeks or so. We are going to cap the Applooza event with a workshop on apple trees led by Jud Kirkness and help prepare a bulk order of fruit trees for interested Sitkans. The Sitka Kitch canning classes were wildly popular but we thought that the extension agent would only be able to travel once per year to communities. I have since learned that she may have received new grant funding for more travel. So I am hoping this will allow us to organize another set of canning classes, including the soups and sauces class that many participants expressed interest in.

• Sitka Collaborative Stewardship Group: We had a quick meeting last night. It was sparsely attended, but there was a lot of updated information from the FS about the Kruzof Island restoration projects. Andrew was also able to share info about the TAC and remind people that they can attend the TAC meeting in November (19-21st) here in Sitka.

• As I mentioned, Alana, Lia, Adam, Bob and myself ventured to Vancouver last week with other to begin our course work. It was really interesting and eye opening, I am very excited about the programming. It was also nice to have a chance to get to know  other SSP partners better as well as other people working on similar projects throughout Canada. Over the next several months we will be attending classes online and working towards a better understanding of Community Development and what that means for our communities.

• Wilderness Kiosk in Petersburg: SCS partnered with the Petersburg district so they could take advantage of the National Wilderness Association’s kiosk grant program. We are administering grant funds and helping them source all of the materials for building a kiosk. They have ordered everything through Gordon Chew in Tenakee and will have high school students building a kiosk entirely of locally sourced Tongass timber.

• This week I will be attending the SSP retreat along with the other SSP partners. I am really looking forward to all the new momentum and spending time connecting with everyone!

 

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