Food Businesses Encouraged to Apply to the Path to Prosperity Competition

The 2017 Path to Prosperity (P2P) sustainable business competition aims to identify and support innovative Southeast Alaska food businesses.  Supporting local food businesses reduces Southeast Alaska’s dependence on imports, strengthens community resiliency, and promotes sustainable use of the region’s natural bounty.

Path To Prosperity is a collaboration between The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and Spruce Root, Inc.  Spruce Root and TNC are committed to strengthening local food systems by supporting food entrepreneurs from across the region.  “We’re excited to try something a little different for the next round and connect with the growing local foods movement in Southeast Alaska,” says P2P competition administrator Paul Hackenmueller.  “This year’s competition will provide resources to help local food entrepreneurs incorporate social, economic, and environmental sustainability techniques into their business models.”

Eligible businesses must operate primarily in Southeast Alaska and be involved in the growing, harvesting, processing, aggregation, preparation or distribution of food.  “P2P applicants can be existing businesses or start-ups,” said Hackenmueller. “We want to encourage new entrepreneurs to apply, even if they haven’t started their business yet, so the Round 1 application doesn’t require a full business plan.  We only ask for a basic description of the business concept.”  P2P helps entrepreneurs identify ways to make their businesses profitable, while also having positive social and environmental impacts on their communities.

Twelve applicants will be selected as finalists to advance to Round 2 of the competition and attend P2P’s innovative Business Boot Camp weekend in Juneau.  All twelve finalists receive one-on-one mentorship and consulting that they can use to help write their business plans and grow their businesses after they return to their communities.  The Boot Camp experience is valuable for all finalists who attend, whether or not they win the competition.  “Thanks to P2P, I have a clear vision of where I am headed and a solid business plan that I developed as the roadmap to the future of our company,” said Tina Steffen of Skya’ana Coffee Co. in Klawock, one of two winners of the 2016 competition.

Timeline for 2017 Path To Prosperity Competition

  •         April 1, 2017 – Application Period Opens
  •         May 9, 2017 – Webinar
  •         May 31, 2017 – Applications Due
  •         July 7, 2017 – Announce Finalists Advancing to Round 2
  •         September 29 – October 1, 2017 – Boot Camp Weekend in Juneau
  •         December 3, 2017 – Business Plan Submissions Deadline
  •         February 2018 –Two Winners Announced

The competition is open to all Southeast Alaska residents.  This includes individuals, for-profit businesses and tribal entities.

 

Click here to apply and learn more!

Biomass-Heated Greenhouse Handbook Helps Turn Dream into Reality

Written by Shaina Kilcoyne, Renewable Energy Alaska Project

On a warm, bluebird day in April, Southeast Island School District and the Sustainable Southeast Partnership led a 25 person tour to Coffman Cove, Thorne Bay and Kasaan on Prince of Wales Island to see their biomass and greenhouse projects in person.  Tour participants from Hoonah, Kake, Hydaburg, Klawock, Petersburg, Tenakee Springs, Ontario and the Yukon each had in hand a Biomass Heated Greenhouse Handbook. This comprehensive handbook outlines how to turn these inspiring greenhouses from dream to reality. It was unveiled a day prior at the Alaska Wood Energy Conference in Ketchikan and is a free resource available to schools and anybody who is interested in building a Biomass Heated Greenhouse locally.   The USDA Forest Service and the Alaska Energy Authority commissioned the Handbook, in part to share successes and lessons learned from the Southeast Island School District and help streamline the process for future projects. Nobody wants to re-invent the wheel, and handbooks like these provide the tools so that interested local leaders don’t need to!

“We teach retention, other schools teach compliance” –Colter Barnes

Back on the tour on Prince of Wales Island, five to seven year old students confidently walked out to the chicken coop to do their morning chores – collecting and counting eggs, feeding chickens and ducks, refilling water.  Two high schooler’s run outside to the biomass boiler shed to stoke the fire between classes.  A middle school class weighs goldfish, calculates the amount of fish food to feed them (3% of their mass), and tests the water levels in the aquaponic greenhouse. 

Of the 500 plus schools in Alaska, four on Prince of Wales Island are now displacing heating fuel and imported foods with local woody biomass and greenhouses. According to Principal Colter Barnes, the $200 earned from delivering a cord of wood can make a big difference for families in these high cost communities, and produces about the same amount of heat as $500 worth of diesel fuel.  Students fund sports travel and even requested more duties stoking the boiler and hauling and cutting wood a couple of weeks ago to save up for prom.

These greenhouses are truly inspiring. They are creating jobs and economic development, generating clean, affordable, local energy, teaching nutrition and culinary arts, applied learning, and community engagement.  This is a story of building healthy, culturally vibrant communities and a more resilient region and the newly published handbook will help take this fantastic island-wide project to the next level.

The 2017 Biomass Heated Greenhouse Tour

Reflections from Ian Johnson, Community Catalyst in Hoonah

The community of Hoonah is currently working to determine if a district biomass heat-loop and biomass-linked greenhouse are right for our community. We are hoping to save energy and cultivate more local produce here in rural Alaska.

Lucky for Hoonah, schools on Prince of Wales Island are already pioneering biomass-heated greenhouses. The Sustainable Southeast Partnership is great because it helps connect ideas and successes from one community, and share them with change-makers across our region. The Biomass Greenhouse Tour arranged by Shaina Kilcoyne and Lia Heifetz of the Sustainable Southeast Partnership, brought 5 community members from Hoonah and 21 other participants from Alaska and Canada to Prince of Wales to examine their biomass linked greenhouses. The experience was powerful.

We started in Coffman Cove with the gardeners of the future – the kindergarten class is tasked with feeding the chickens each morning and collecting eggs. It was delightful, heart-warming, and inspiring to see their bond with the chickens and the enjoyment of their work. From there we learned from the high schoolers and Principal, Colter Barnes how the local biomass sourcing provides money to the local economy ($175/ cord) while warming the greenhouse at a cost savings compared to diesel – a $175 cord of wood is equivalent to about $500 in diesel.

We then moved to the large greenhouse in Coffman cove and were given a tour by the middle-schoolers who run it’s aquaponics operation and harvesting. The excitement was truly electric as it became evident that the Coffman Cove model creates student involvement, provides to the local economy during the lean winter months, generates food security, and provides money to the school through produce sales. These were just SOME of the benefits of their incredible operation. We continued our learning by visiting the greenhouses at Thorne Bay and Kasaan to learn about how we can scale our greenhouses and about slightly different boiler systems. Ending the day at the the Whale House in Kasaan was just icing on the cake!

I can’t thank enough Shaina and Lia for putting together this incredible event. I know it will cause quite a stir in Hoonah and we begin to look at our greenhouse options here.

Prince of Wales Biomass Greenhouse Tour, April 13, 2017 – Limited Space

Following the Wood Energy Conference in Ketchikan on April 11 – 12th, 2017, a biomass heated greenhouse tour will take place on Prince of Wales Island on April 13.

Who should attend? School district personnel (leadership, teachers, or maintenance), or community organizations, or individuals interested in championing a biomass system and/or greenhouse.

Southeast Island School District is successfully operating biomass-heated greenhouses in four communities on Prince of Wales (POW) Island: Thorne Bay, Kasaan, Coffman Cove, and Naukati. These communities face many similar challenges to other rural communities of Southeast Alaska. Participants will tour the biomass and greenhouse projects in Coffman Cove, Thorne Bay, and possibly Kasaan. This field trip will facilitate the formation of peer-to-peer sharing of resources and experiences pertaining to the planning and implementing of biomass greenhouses in Alaska’s unique environments. To read about the greenhouses on Prince of Wales, check out this story from Edible Alaska magazine. 

 

This tour is limited to 18 registrants, submit your application today*!

*Travel, lodging and meal costs are the responsibility of the registrant unless otherwise noted. 

Questions should be directed to Shaina Kilcoyne, s.kilcoyne@realaska.org, 907-331-7409

 

 

Tour Estimated Expenses

The expenses estimated below do not include travel to and from Ketchikan.  

Inter Island Ferry Ketchikan to Hollis

$50

POW Island transportation 

$50

Ferry or Flight to Ketchikan

$50 – $230

Per night at Fireweed Lodge

$150

Meals

~$60/day

Total estimated Travel Budget

$360 – $540

Travel Links Here:

Register for the Wood Energy Conference (not required)
Book travel with the Inter Island Ferry
Book travel with Island Air Express
Or book travel with Taquan Air 
Reserve a room with Fireweed Lodge (rooms reserved under Kilcoyne)

 

Itinerary

Wednesday, April 12th

3:30pm MV Stikine Ferry departs for Hollis from Ketchikan, arrive 6:30pm, drive to Klawock Fireweed Lodge. Dinner at Fireweed Lodge

Thursday, April 13th

6:00am Breakfast at Fireweed Lodge

7:15am Depart for Coffman Cove, arrive at 8:30am

8:45am Tour Coffman Cove greenhouse, garden and boiler

Question and answer with principal and students of Coffman Cove School

10:15am Depart Coffman Cove for Thorne Bay, snacks provided en route

11:45 Tour Thorne Bay greenhouse and boiler

Question and answer with Laura Cooper (greenhouse manager), Jonathan

Fitzpatrick (engineer), Priscilla Goulding (finance) and students of Thorne Bay School

12:45pm Lunch at Thorne Bay Cafe (student operated café)

Discussion with students operating the Cafe

1:30pm Depart Thorne Bay for Kasaan (A vehicle will leave to get travelers on the afternoon flight to Ketchikan to the Klawock Airport, arriving at 2:15pm for Island Air flight to Ketchikan airport, Alaska Air flight 67 to Juneau)

2:30 Arrive in Kasaan, tour greenhouse, and biomass boiler

Time to explore the the Carving Shed, the Totem Trail Cafe, and Totem Trail to the restored Chief Son-i-Hat Whale House.  

4:00pm depart Kasaan for Klawock, arrive Klawock 5:30pm

Klawock, the Water and Her People

Written by Quinn Aboudara, Supporting Photographs by Kendall Rock, Lee House and Quinn Aboudara

The water laps against the side of the boat gently, the sound rhythmic and steady, like a heartbeat. The engine thrums softly in anticipation then roars to life as I twist the throttle to push the 16 foot aluminum skiff away from the dock and onto Klawock Lake.

My name is Quinn Aboudara, and I’m a lifelong resident of Prince of Wales Island. The Klawock Lake is part of my identity and life. Adopted and raised by the Taakwaneidi Raven/Sculpin Clan,  Klawock Lake is more than just a simple body of water for me. Like many residents of Klawock and the surrounding communities, I harvest food from these waters like salmon, trout and beaver. Its tree lined shores provide me with berries and edible roots, bark and grasses for weaving.

Working for the Klawock Cooperative Association I was presented the opportunity to work with the local tribe and with the Sustainable Southeast Partnership as a community catalyst. Klawock Lake and the watershed that feeds it are a fragile system. Over the last 30 years, this life-giving watershed has seen substantial change which have raised continued concern for the residents of Klawock. Some of those environmental changes include: declining fish runs, decreased snow caps on the surrounding mountains, and development along valuable spawning habitat. In 2016, The Klawock Cooperative Association (a federally recognized tribal government), in partnership with Klawock Heenya Corporation, Kia Environmental, and The Nature Conservancy, with funding provided by the Bureau of Indian Affairs began a four month study in regards to one of these concerns: the declining returns of the wild run of sockeye salmon to Klawock Lake.


We began going to Klawock Lake with a single question: Is there anything feeding upon the sockeye fry? What we returned with was more questions. The data gathered from the first season of the Klawock Lake predation study showed that sockeye fry predation was minimal.  A second predation study is in the works for 2017 to support and provide stronger data to inform decision making. Simultaneously,  we will explore other potential factors in the declining salmon run.


This work, a community priority of both traditional and cultural concern, is a key component of my position within the Klawock Cooperative Association. And as a community catalyst I am given the opportunity to approach this challenge, and many of the other challenges within my community with a holistic approach. There are many challenges of living in a rural Alaskan island community, the high cost of food, a lack of employment opportunities and stable jobs, limited economic development, and through the partnership between the Klawock Cooperative Association and the Sustainable Southeast Partnership I am allowed to address these challenges and pursue solutions. Solutions such as working with local stakeholders to develop a trained local workforce, designing and building greenhouses, providing small business development workshops, and many other opportunities.

It is through this multi-faceted approach toward creating a resilient community that I have dedicated my time and energy to protect the way of life in Klawock. I do this work for myself, my family, and my community, so we may continue to prosper and enjoy our way of life along the bank of the Klawock River indefinitely.

Registration for Southeast Alaska 2017 Farmers Summit Opens

Press Release

Share lessons learned and techniques for overcoming challenges of commercially growing food in Southeast Alaska; learn specific skills, technology, and research that contribute to commercial farming success and efficiency; connect with new and experienced farmers to build an inspiring network. 

Early bird registration is now open for the Southeast Alaska Farmers Summit 2017, the 2nd biennial summit designed to bring together experienced and aspiring commercial growers and support agencies. The Summit will be held February 24 through 26, 2017, at the Chilkat Center in Haines, Alaska. A discounted registration rate is available to attendees who register on or before January 21st, 2017. Travel and registration scholarships are available.

The conference will feature presentations from experienced commercial growers and support agencies, and topical discussions and panels to share resources and lessons learned. Speakers include Doug Collins, Extension Faculty and Soil Scientist with Washington State University’s Small Farms Program; Megan Talley, Farm Manager and Educator at Alaska Pacific University; and experienced Farmers from Southeast Alaska; among others. 

“This will be an opportunity for commercial growers of Southeast Alaska to learn from each other, find opportunities to collaborate, and build a network that can leverage everyone’s efforts,” said Lia Heifetz, Local Food Director for Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition. “Many resources will be shared over the course of the weekend – from financial planning for small farms to innovative solutions for soil building, policy implications for agriculture, and much more.”

Other topics to be addressed at the Southeast Alaska Farmers Summit include:

  • On Farm Food Safety
  • Building your Farm Community
  • Planning for Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)
  • The Future of Seed Saving in Alaska
  • High Tunnel Applications and Innovations
  • Electric and Walk-in Cold Storage for your Farm
  • Biomass Heated Greenhouses and Aquaponics
  • Per Foot Crop Values for Market Sales
  • Using Local Amendments to Improve Soil Quality
  • Fruit Trees and Grafting Techniques
  • Policy and Initiatives
  • Building a Future of Farming with Internships and Education
  • Business Planning and Farm Finances

For more information and to register for the conference please visit: http://www.alaskawatershedcoalition.org/safs2017/

Pin It on Pinterest